Our UKCAT Decision Analysis Tutorial will hopefully provide you with techniques to help you succeed in the Decision Analysis section of your UKCAT test. Always check the official UKCAT website for official information! Information is for 2013 entry. Always check information directly with official sources

 In the Decision Analysis subtest of the UKCAT you will face 28 questions which are all related to a code that you have access to throughout. The code will consist of basic codes and operating codes split into numbers and letters. At first this looks daunting, but by using the tips and advice in this Decision Analysis tutorial you can help to ensure you maximise your UKCAT score. 

Know the types of questions

People generally fear the unknown, and that is why it is a great idea to get familiar with the decision analysis questions early on. They do look complex and slightly bewildering at first, but after a few practice runs you will feel more at home with them. You must be aware that there are two main types of questions you may face, although there may be others. The first is the most common: you will be given a coded message and will have to choose from a list of five possible answers the one which matches the code most precisely. The second type of questions is the reverse of this - you will be given a phrase or statement in English and have to choose from a list of five possible answers the code which most precisely matches the phrase or statement. There may generally be fewer questions of this type in the UKCAT test. 

The second type of questions is the reverse of this - you will be given a phrase or statement in English and have to choose from a list of five possible answers the code which most precisely matches the phrase or statement. There are generally fewer questions of this type in the UKCAT test.

Go with what seems intuitively correct

Otherwise known as going with your gut instinct - the answer which seems to make sense is most likely the correct one (but not always). Use your common sense and judgement to their fullest on this part of the UKCAT. However, rather than letting your instinct and common sense rule you, instead let it guide your investigation as to which is the correct answer.

It might not make much sense

Having said that remember the code you translate in this section of the UKCAT doesn't necessarily have to make much sense -as long as it is a good translation of the code. Sometimes it may seem that words are out of place slightly - but if when you look at it thoroughly you can not see a better way of translating the code then it is most likely the right answer.

Be ready to fill in the blanks

You translate the code as literally "opposite, enjoy (foot, clothes)". This doesn't make much sense to anyone - until that is you look into the code a little deeper. The "opposite" of "enjoy" is "not enjoy" or "dislike". "Foot" and "clothes" together may mean "socks" or "Shoes" - then try to match it up with the possible answers. Be prepared to have to do this sort of guesswork a lot - not everything is meant to be taken literally.

Some things to watch out for

If a possible answer you are looking at has lots of words in it that aren't coded for, it is most likely wrong. The same goes if there are words missing.

Always check the tense of the phrase you are coding - is it in the present, past or future tense?

Be careful of codes like "negative" or "opposite". Put beside a word in the code they can completely change the meaning e.g. dark becomes light, enjoy becomes dislike etc.

Check if there are words being used in the singular or pleural, and whether or not the answers reflect this.

Information provided may not be current or up-to-date, and all information should checked against official information and official sources.


Copyright 2012 Get Into Medicine. All rights reserved.


Copyright 2012 Get Into Medicine